New Photos from Washington, Illinois

These pictures are from the exact same neighborhood I went to in November, 2013. (Scroll down to see November photos.) I hope to interview the tornado survivors I spoke to back then to see how they’re doing.  As you may know, residents from Washington will receive state aid but they did not qualify for FEMA funds. Washington, Illinois is about a 90 minute drive from the Quad Cities. (Some street names have been shaded out to preserve the privacy of homeowners.)

Peoria Journal-Star
Story about Red Cross efforts

Here are only a few of the many Washington area news stories about recovery efforts. The city is still seeking volunteers!

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Be Sure to Watch CNN Heroes, Sunday, Dec. 1 at 7 p.m.

One of the Quad Cities own local heroes, Chad Pregracke, will receive a special honor Sunday night from CNN. His non-profit organization, Living Lands and Waters, has enlisted the help of tens of thousands of volunteers to help clean up the Mississippi and other rivers.  Over the years LLW has expanded its conservation efforts to include teacher workshops, field trip opportunities on the barge that serves as a floating classroom, and many other advocacy activities.

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Tornado Damage and Stories from Survivors in Washington, Illinois

Click to Listen: Don Keley, Washington, Illinois resident

Click to Listen: Katie Petravick describes how her family found out their house was destroyed.

Click to Listen: Eric and Tiffany Judd Siblings describe how their mom survived the tornado.

Follow this link to the slide show on You Tube. flag holder

President Obama Visits Galesburg

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Local Residents React to President’s Message – Click to Listen: Link to audio story


An ocean blue sky dotted with islands of clouds stretched over a crowd of about 400 well-wishers and protesters at Knox College as they greeted President Obama’s motorcade.
Once inside Memorial Gym the president started off reminding Galesburg residents of what they told him about the changing economy in 2005. That’s when the local Maytag factory closed, leaving 1,500 people without good paying jobs.
“So these were stories of families who had worked hard, believed in the American Dream, but they felt like the odds were increasingly stacked against them. And they were right. Things had changed.”
“We’ve had a lot of repercussions in the area and all you have to do is drive around and see. The housing is deteriorating and so on. And people just don’t have enough money to make those improvements. I’m one of those people.”
That’s Sallee Wade. She’s a semi-retired yoga teacher and writer and has lived in Galesburg for years. She’s seen the changes in town since Maytag left.
“I would love to make some improvements on my property but it has lost value.”
“You just don’t have the extra…”
“No, no. There’s no extra. There’s always enough for this day, enough for this day. But I know people who are a lot worse off than I am.”
The president outlined five familiar areas he wants to focus on to help the U.S. stay competitive. They are: modernizing our infrastructure to create jobs, addressing skyrocketing college costs, new home ownership initiatives, continuing to focus on health care, and helping the middle class retire securely.
He also said that, behind closed doors, some Republicans in Congress agree with this agenda. But Mary King said she thinks things in Washington are pretty hopeless.
“I agree with everything he says but I still don’t know how it’s ever going to get done. No, it’s not his fault, but how’s he going to get anything through Congress?”
But George Lane from Peoria thought he heard something a little different.
“Was there anything in particular he said that really kind of struck a chord with you?”
“Yes. That he will go ahead and use the power of his office and try to bypass Congress as much as he can. Congress has not given him any cooperation whatsoever.”
Emails and calls to Illinois GOP leaders to get their responses to Obama’s speech were not returned. But Congressman Aaron Shock’s office directed me to a press release published by the Illinois House GOP Delegation.The delegation says they have worked to repeal the Affordable Care Act, are working on a tax reform bill they say will stimulate the economy, have presented a bill to permanently fix the student loan crisis, and quote: “we stand ready to work toward real, bipartisan solutions, not listen to another stump speech”.
Naturally you would expect to find most people at an Obama speech agreeing with him, but several people who said their own personal economies were fine were worried about global competitiveness. And they’re worried about younger adults and what lies ahead for them.
Doc Patterson is a retired firefighter from Chicago and Monmouth.
“The state of Illinois has been a leader in a lot of things in the world, not only locally here in Galesburg but nationally. And to hear him say we’re going to bring that back, and his plan, those five bullet points, are so important for these younger generations because they’re giving up hope. And I hope this re-energizes the area.”

Link to the GOP press release: here.

Link to full text of the president’s speech: here.
(The audio quote from the speech was gathered from a podcast published on http://www.whitehouse.gov.)

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